Tag Archives | History Happy Hour

Virtual History Happy Hour- Arresting Dress

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In 1863, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors passed a law that criminalized appearing in public in “a dress not belonging to his or her sex.” Adopted as part of a broader anti-indecency campaign, cross-dressing law became a flexible tool for policing multiple gender transgressions, facilitating over one hundred arrests before the century’s end. Over forty U.S. cities passed similar laws during this time, yet little is known about their emergence, operations, or effects.

In this talk, professor Clare Sears traces the career of San Francisco’s anti-cross-dressing law from municipal courtrooms and codebooks to newspaper scandals, vaudevillian theater, freak-show performances, and commercial “slumming tours.” Using a wealth of archival material, they show that the law did not simply police normative gender but actively produced it by creating new definitions of gender normality and abnormality. Their talk also highlights the tenacity of people who defied the law, spoke out when sentenced, and articulated different gender possibilities.

About Our Presenter

Clare Sears is director of the Sexuality Studies Master of Arts Program and associate professor of Sociology and Sexuality Studies at San Francisco State University. They are author of the book, Arresting Dress: Cross-Dressing, Law and Fascination in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco (Duke University Press, 2015), which was shortlisted for a Lambda Literary Award in 2016 and was co-winner of the Committee on LGBT History’s John Boswell Award in 2017. They have published articles in Women’s Studies Quarterly, GLQ, and the Routledge History of Queer America. They also co-edited a special issue of the journal Social Justice on sexuality and criminalization.

Clare holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz (2005), an M.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz (2002), and a BA from the University of Leeds, England (1992). They have received multiple awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship and a postdoctoral fellowship from the University of California Humanities Research Institute. They are currently working on a new book-length project that explores the interplay of sexuality, gender and psychiatric disability in law and popular culture.

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How to Register

Registration for this event is free via Eventbrite. Once you register, you will be sent information about how to access the webinar on the event date, including a Zoom link. A reminder with that same link will be sent to you 24 hours before the event.

Pay What You Can

We are accepting donations for this event. If you are able to contribute today, we ask that you use this option to register. We understand that not everyone is in the position to make a donation today, but if you are, we suggest a donation of $5-$10.

Your donation helps support the mission of Camron-Stanford House, and helps us to continue to provide programs just like this one! Donations provide funding for speaker honoraria, technology expenses, and much more that goes on behind the scenes to make these Virtual History Happy Hours possible.

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Images (L to R)- Ella Wesner, c.1873 photographed by Napoleon Sarony; “Wolf in a Sheep’s Clothing or Jeff in Crinoline, 1865. Image courtesy of West Virginia University Library; Omar Kingsley performing as Ella Zoyara, c.1860.

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Virtual History Happy Hour- “Tattooed and Tenacious: Conversation with the Curator”

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Almost a quarter of American women have permanent ink, compared to just 19% of men. Younger people are even more likely to be tattooed, as more than a third of Americans between the ages of 18 and 40 have skin art. But, what about the first women to get tattooed? Who were they, and why did they get inked?

They came from across the U.S. and crossed class lines. From the society women who followed trends, to the working-class women who worked in circus sideshows, American women have always had an intimate and fascinating relationship with tattoos. Join Amy Cohen, the curator of traveling exhibit “Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History,” as she highlights just a few of the adventurous women who lived, worked, and tattooed in the West prior to World War II.

About Our Presenter

Amy Cohen is the Executive Director of Exhibit Envoy, a California-based nonprofit that creates and travels exhibits for small museums, libraries, and cultural centers. She is also the curator of “Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History,” which has been hosted by 12 different California institutions. Cohen earned her B.A. in History (summa cum laude) from the College of Wooster in Ohio and her M.A. in Museum Studies from John F. Kennedy University.

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How to Register

Registration for this event is free via Eventbrite. Once you register, you will be sent information about how to access the webinar on the event date, including a Zoom link. A reminder with that same link will be sent to you 24 hours before the event.

Pay What You Can

We are accepting donations for this event. If you are able to contribute today, we ask that you use this option to register. We understand that not everyone is in the position to make a donation today, but if you are, we suggest a donation of $5-$10.

Your donation helps support the mission of Camron-Stanford House, and helps us to continue to provide programs just like this one! Donations provide funding for speaker honoraria, technology expenses, and much more that goes on behind the scenes to make these Virtual History Happy Hours possible.

Register

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Virtual History Happy Hour: “Ina Coolbrith: Poet, Mentor, and Oakland’s First Public Librarian”

Virtual History Happy Hour: “Ina Coolbrith: Poet, Mentor, and Oakland’s First Public Librarian”

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Ina Coolbrith’s passion was poetry, but she made a living as a librarian in Oakland where she mentored Jack London, Isadora Duncan, and Calla Shasta Miller, Joaquin Miller’s daughter. Years before Coolbrith was named California’s first poet laureate in 1915, she encouraged youth seeking knowledge at the Oakland Public Library.

About Our Presenter

Aleta George is the award-winning author of Ina Coolbrith: The Bittersweet Song of California’s First Poet Laureate. Her work has also been published in California Magazine, Estuary News, and Smithsonian.

 

Pay What You Can

We are accepting donations for this event. If you are able to contribute today, we ask that you use this option to register. We understand that not everyone is in the position to make a donation today, but if you are, we suggest a donation of $5-$10.

Your donation helps support the mission of Camron-Stanford House, and helps us to continue to provide programs just like this one! Donations provide funding for speaker honoraria, technology expenses, and much more that goes on behind the scenes to make these Virtual History Happy Hours possible.

Register Now

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Virtual History Happy Hour: “Confections and Novelties: An Overview of 19th Century Hats”

Virtual History Happy Hour: “Confections and Novelties: An Overview of 19th Century Hats”


Join us for a live review of women’s hats in the 19th century, including a look at antique pieces from the speaker’s collection and recreating the styles with both modern and Victorian methods. The discussion will include a look at original fashion plates and museum pieces to chart the course of style over the 19th century, touching on societal impact and the art of the hat itself. Attendees will see an 1850s drawn bonnet, 1880s straw summer caps, quilted winter hoods, a caned calash circa 1790-1800 and more. Learn about tremblants, wire frames, bonnet molds and millinery manuals. The presentation will include demos of some millinery techniques, reviewing both original and reproduction patterns, a close-up peek at original hats and recommendations on restyling or creating your own pieces.

All skill levels welcome, students will be able to experience both a lecture and a live workroom demo, all on-camera. A handout will be given for further reading and info.

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About Our Speaker

Chantal Filson has been a professional costume designer for over 20 years, fueled by a deep obsession with the 19th century. Her love for design and puzzles led to the development of a hat pattern line based on Victorian fashion plates and original sources. In 2020 she founded Costume On: An Online Conference for Historical Costuming, an entirely virtual event with live teachers and museum curators that reaches students across the globe. She is primarily nocturnal, often covered with paint and absolutely loves to teach. Visit www.costumeon.com for more information about Chantal’s Costume On conferences and workshops.

How to Register

Reigstration for this event is free. Once you register, you will be sent information about how to access the webinar on the event date, including a Zoom link. A reminder with that same link will be sent to you 24 hours before the event.

Pay What You Can

We are accepting donations for this event. If you are able to contribute today, we ask that you use this option to register. We understand that not everyone is in the position to make a donation today, but if you are, we suggest a donation of $5-$10.

Your donation helps support the mission of Camron-Stanford House, and helps us to continue to provide programs just like this one! Donations provide funding for speaker honoraria, technology expenses, and much more that goes on behind the scenes to make these Virtual History Happy Hours possible.

Register

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Virtual History Happy Hour: Restoring a Gold Rush Cabin

When gold was discovered in the rivers of Sutter Hill in Colma, California, the discovery drastically changed the landscape of 19th century California. A wave of settlers with gold in their eyes moved into mining hot-spots, building (and sometimes destroying) communities in the process.
In this presentation, Andy Carpentier takes us through the restoration of an 1866 Gold Rush Cabin located in Sonora, CA, known as the “Queen of the Southern Mines.” Join us for insight into the history, architecture, and the twists and turns of this incredible restoration project.

Our Guest of Honor
Andy Carpentier is a California based Architect with over 30 years experience. Andy served 11 years on the Oakland Landmarks Advisory Board, and has dedicated his time as a board member, trustee, and adviser for several historic properties in Oakland.

How to Register
Reigstration for this event is free. Once you register, you will be sent information about how to access the webinar on the event date, including a Zoom link. A reminder with that same link will be sent to you 24 hours before the event.

Pay What You Can
We are accepting donations for this event. If you are able to contribute today, we ask that you use this option to register. We understand that not everyone is in the position to make a donation today, but if you are, we suggest a donation of $5-$10.
Your donation helps support the mission of Camron-Stanford House, and helps us to continue to provide programs just like this one! Donations provide funding for speaker honoraria, technology expenses, and much more that goes on behind the scenes to make these History Happy Hours possible.

Register by clicking here

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